Review: The Murderer’s Daughters

How deep does the parent/child relationship go? If you saw your father kill your mother in a drunken argument then plunge a knife into your little sister’s chest or you were the sister whose chest he plunged the knife into – could you or would you forgive him? Could you still love him? How would it shape the rest of your life?

These are the questions posed in The Murderer’s Daughters.

Lulu believes she is the reason her family fell apart: she opened the door to the apartment – she let her father in on the fateful day he murdered her mother and stabbed her sister. The sense of guilt haunts her through out her life and causes her to feel the need to protect her baby sister who she both loves fiercely and resents for her carefree lifestyle and her need to maintain a thread of a relationship with her father.

Merry, the youngest and Daddy’s little girl has vague, blurry memories of what happened. She knows it happened but at the same time can’t/won’t quite believe all the negatives about her daddy. While Lulu insists their father is as good as dead and maintains the story that their parents were killed in a car accident Merry continues to visit her father in prison.

I wasn’t sure about this book to start with because of the subject matter – it’s an interesting concept to explore but at the same time needs to be handled delicately and with respect as for many people this scenerio is their reality but the author had obviously done her homework and research because this book was a rollercoaster of emotion and so intricately written. I loved how it was written in the first person and switched from Lulu to Merry and portrayed each of their differing emotions and issues.

Not exactly a light read but definitely a great read.

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